The Latest

Apr 6, 2014 / 15,013 notes
unicorn-meat-is-too-mainstream:

Mister Spock riding a winged unicorn over a rainbow by Brooklyn-based artist and illustrator Tim O’Brien for an issue of Men’s Health
Feb 9, 2014 / 189 notes

unicorn-meat-is-too-mainstream:

Mister Spock riding a winged unicorn over a rainbow by Brooklyn-based artist and illustrator Tim O’Brien for an issue of Men’s Health

Feb 9, 2014 / 1,030 notes

(via togifs)

It took many years of vomiting up all the filth I’d been taught about myself, and half-believed, before I was able to walk on this earth as though I had a right to be here.
James Baldwin (via creatingaquietmind)

(via teachingliteracy)

Feb 9, 2014 / 37,755 notes
Feb 9, 2014 / 667 notes
togifs:

[video]
Feb 9, 2014 / 53,058 notes
Feb 9, 2014 / 415,053 notes

justdorothynodandridge:

Kayden’s first time experiencing rain (x)

(via internal-acceptance-movement)

4gifs:

So close. [video]
Feb 9, 2014 / 36,586 notes

4gifs:

So close. [video]

(via togifs)

Jan 16, 2014 / 3,961 notes

awkwardsituationist:

photos by mark garfinkel of boston firefighter sean coyle rescuing a husky named sylvie who fell through the ice some forty yards from the shore of boston harbor. sylvie, who had been treading water for thirty minutes, “was pretty shaken up when i got her, and her barks had turned into whimpers” said coyle, who briefly fell in the freezing water himself. “if the ice breaks and this goes south, i’m in this. i’m not going to let her drown,” he said of his thoughts at the time.

Jan 16, 2014 / 9,859 notes

(via togifs)

theclassyissue:

Appreciate Everything 
Jan 16, 2014 / 97,512 notes

theclassyissue:

Appreciate Everything 

(via simplici-tea)

Jan 16, 2014 / 5,488 notes

awkwardsituationist:

photos by richard harrington in inukjuak (eastern canadian arctic) of the padleimut tribe. they were taken in 1947, just as the canadian government was abandoning its arctic policy of benign neglect, to use a nixonian phrase, and shifting to one of largely forced settlement and relocation. (the qikiqtani truth commission)

teachingliteracy:

chicagopubliclibrary:
‘Beach Library’ Pops Up In Southern France
Via Architizer:
Architect Matali Crasset’s latest design is the “Bibliothèque de Plage,” or “Beach Library,” which crawls Istres, France’s coastline. The portable structure houses 350 titles, including some of Crasset’s favorite novels like Eat Me by Agnes Desarthes and Things by George Perec. It’s not a food vendor, but this pop-up library may just be the next best treat.
Click here for more photos of the “Bibliothèque de Plage!”
Jan 16, 2014 / 1,239 notes

teachingliteracy:

chicagopubliclibrary:

‘Beach Library’ Pops Up In Southern France

Via Architizer:

Architect Matali Crasset’s latest design is the “Bibliothèque de Plage,” or “Beach Library,” which crawls Istres, France’s coastline. The portable structure houses 350 titles, including some of Crasset’s favorite novels like Eat Me by Agnes Desarthes and Things by George Perec. It’s not a food vendor, but this pop-up library may just be the next best treat.

Click here for more photos of the “Bibliothèque de Plage!”

Jan 16, 2014 / 16,770 notes

(via togifs)

For most of human history, a fundamental problem has been the scarcity of material goods and resources, and so we have become ever more efficient in our methods of production and created rituals to enshrine the importance of objects in our culture. Less than a century ago, human beings made a world-changing transition through their rapacious industry. We now inhabit a world in which the overproduction of goods, rather than their scarcity, is one of our most fundamental problems. Yet our economy functions by inciting us to produce more and more with each passing year. In turn, we require cultural forms to enable us to sort through the glut, and our rituals are once again being directed towards the immaterial, towards quality and not quantity. This requires a shift in our values, from producing objects to selecting amongst those that already exist.

In answering the annual Edge Question, which asks 176 prominent thinkers “What scientific idea is ready for retirement?”,  legendary curator Hans Ulrich Obrist speaks to the necessity of curation as a sensemaking tool for our age of abundance. 

Also see previous years’ Edge Questions, including “What scientific concept will improve everybody’s cognitive toolkit?” (2012) and “What is your favorite deep, elegant, or beautiful explanation?” (2013).

(via explore-blog)

(via explore-blog)

Jan 16, 2014 / 214 notes