The Latest

Sep 9, 2014 / 35 notes
To completely end your unease of mind, all you need to do is see that there is really is nothing “out there” to get because, already, within this moment, everything is whole and complete. In doing so, you can awaken from the perennial confusion, from the existential angst, from the unanswered question of what life is about.
Steve Hagen (via mysteriouscat7)

(via zenhumanism)

Sep 7, 2014 / 45 notes
When we stop distracting ourselves, and courageously dive into the heart of any feeling, positive or negative, right or wrong, we rediscover the vast ocean of who we are. Every feeling is made of unspeakable intelligence.
Jeff Foster (via riversawaken)

(via zenhumanism)

Sep 7, 2014 / 61 notes
licika:

☢ Acid Chaos
Sep 7, 2014 / 2 notes

licika:

☢ Acid Chaos

You look at where you’re going and where you are and it never makes sense, but then you look back at where you’ve been and a pattern seems to emerge.
Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (via airplanes)
Sep 7, 2014 / 53 notes
Sep 7, 2014 / 1,827 notes
living-zen-nature:

autumn picnic
Sep 7, 2014 / 20 notes

living-zen-nature:

autumn picnic

spiritlifting:

personal stuff
Sep 7, 2014 / 76 notes
valerielavigneyoga:

to see another with clarity and objectivity, one must first master stillness - alberto villoldo
Sep 7, 2014 / 92 notes

valerielavigneyoga:

to see another with clarity and objectivity, one must first master stillness - alberto villoldo

fuckyeahyoga:

Bakasana on Dial Mountain, Adirondacks, New York
Sep 7, 2014 / 497 notes

fuckyeahyoga:

Bakasana on Dial Mountain, Adirondacks, New York

Sep 7, 2014 / 305 notes
Sep 5, 2014 / 2,163 notes
humansofnewyork:

I visited the Confident Children out of Conflict (CCC) Center in Juba, a place where displaced children in South Sudan are given shelter, an education, affection, and a second chance. I was greeted by Cathy, the center’s director. She was very kind, but also a bit nervous about my presence. She’d been briefed about my interview process. “We can talk about happy moments,” she said. “But let’s not ask these children about their saddest moments, or times they felt afraid. Many of them were malnourished, abandoned, or regularly sexually abused. Some of them have witnessed extreme violence. When journalists ask them to relive these memories, it can set them back for an entire month. They begin to act out. Often their trauma is so bad, that when the children first arrive, they can be very hateful toward me. But I feel blessed by the hate. Because I know it’s part of the healing process. And if they need someone to hate so that they can heal, I’m glad it can be me.”A few minutes after this conversation, a young girl walked up to Cathy, gave her a hug, and ran away. Cathy seemed quite moved. “That girl was very badly abused,” she said. “She’s been here for months. And that’s the first time she’s ever hugged me.”(Juba, South Sudan)
Sep 5, 2014 / 2,814 notes

humansofnewyork:

I visited the Confident Children out of Conflict (CCC) Center in Juba, a place where displaced children in South Sudan are given shelter, an education, affection, and a second chance. I was greeted by Cathy, the center’s director. She was very kind, but also a bit nervous about my presence. She’d been briefed about my interview process. “We can talk about happy moments,” she said. “But let’s not ask these children about their saddest moments, or times they felt afraid. Many of them were malnourished, abandoned, or regularly sexually abused. Some of them have witnessed extreme violence. When journalists ask them to relive these memories, it can set them back for an entire month. They begin to act out. Often their trauma is so bad, that when the children first arrive, they can be very hateful toward me. But I feel blessed by the hate. Because I know it’s part of the healing process. And if they need someone to hate so that they can heal, I’m glad it can be me.”

A few minutes after this conversation, a young girl walked up to Cathy, gave her a hug, and ran away. Cathy seemed quite moved. “That girl was very badly abused,” she said. “She’s been here for months. And that’s the first time she’s ever hugged me.”

(Juba, South Sudan)

Sep 5, 2014 / 267 notes
Sep 5, 2014 / 251 notes

explore-blog:

Every Runner Has a Reason – wonderful short film about a homeless man who found himself in running and turned his life around. What a powerful testament to the idea even more important than running the right way is running for the right reason.

(via Doobybrain)